AMOS YEE – Are some Singaporeans Actually Looking Up To Him?

Hal Ehwal Teh-Kini

TehTarik received this screenshot from a fellow Singaporean about a Facebook user who had some “interesting” points to raise about Amos Yee. Now, Amos Yee has been a household conversation topic for some time now and here at TehTarik, we love a bit of banter.

It’s true that everyone is entitled to their own opinion but sometimes we may get too carried away with that.

 

This Facebook user identified Amos Yee as someone “who exemplifies all the qualities we want to teach our children”. He reiterated this again saying that Amos Yee’s “got all the traits that we want in our youth”. (Brother, kau okay tak?) We would just like to say that to put Amos Yee on a pedestal and idolize him as a prime example for our youth is crossing the line. You can exercise your right to form your own opinions but in this case, we are talking about the same guy who has multiple charges against him for wounding religious feelings of Muslims AND Christians, as well as, charges for posting obscene images online.

 

The Facebook post then goes on to highlight Amos Yee’s “positive” qualities and inserts the disclaimer that these qualities are given “if you abstract from Amos’ (political) values and preferences”. Some people have general preferences in terms of what you like to eat or drink but this young man’s ‘values and preferences’ are too extreme. Have you seen the content he produced in support of paedophilia or child pornography?

A friend of the Facebook user who posted this status glorifying Amos Yee didn’t miss out on this fact, evident from the counter-argument he raised below:

TehTarik’s concern is that if you quote Amos Yee as a ‘role model’, what message are we sending out to the youths? Amos Yee was a liberal teenage blogger who took advantage of his freedom of expression, without thinking of the consequences. At 16 years old, charges were pressed against him and he had to deal with massive public condemnation. Granted we want our youths to think for themselves but we also want them to be mature and forward thinking. We do not want our youths to think we condone his actions and values.

The Facebook status then goes on to draw parallels from our rejection of Amos’ opinions to how Singaporeans were riled up against the Jingapore mural. It was done up by an artist, Jing Quek, with the title ‘WELCOME TO JINGAPORE!” and not many took a liking to it. (We understand this brother lah. Rimas already. Singaporeans are not being more open-minded kan?) But then again, you cannot compare the Amos Yee saga to a debate over a title of a mural.

As a society, TehTarik believes we are striving to be a better version of ourselves day by day. Every single person who had some form of reaction towards this abang’s Facebook post, good job. It just goes to show that our society are thinkers and that’s one step forward towards being a progressive society but if you want to start a debate over Amos Yee as a ‘role model’ for our youths, you need to learn to draw the line.

 

This article is written by our writer. Feel free to share. 

Comments